Seeing Things, Saying Things

Musings About Writing, Photography and Teaching

Posts Tagged ‘statues

Another Penn State Graduate and the Nittany Lion

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The limestone Nittany Lion statue  is probably the most photographed location on the campus of Penn State University at University Park. Thousands of Penn State graduates have had a photograph made of themselves standing with the lion.

It was not graduation day when I happened upon this mother taking making an image of her daughter posing with the lion.

Perhaps they wanted to make their image on a day when not as many people would be waiting in line for their turn with the lion.

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Pounding Out Another Story

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Ernie Pyle is a name that was familiar to those who lived during World War II.

The Indiana-born journalist was, arguably, the best known war correspondent of his day, earning the Pulitzer Prize in 1944 for his accounts of the life of ordinary soldiers.

Writing for the Scripps-Howard chain of newspapers, Pyle was killed on April 18, 1945, during the Battle of Okinawa.

For many years the building housing the School of Journalism at Indiana University was named after Pyle.

There was a bust of him inside the building and, if my memory serves me correctly, a photograph or painting of him elsewhere.

Some incorrectly thought the School of Journalism itself was named after Pyle, but that was not the case.

Not long ago the School of Journalism was merged with a couple of other programs to create a new Media School, which was moved to Franklin Hall.

As part of that move, a statue of Pyle pounding out a story on his portable typewriter in the war zone was commissioned and placed near the entrance to Franklin Hall.

The statue brings to life a glimpse of a time that virtually all college students today only know from history books.

Roots of General Motors

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This building in Flint, Michigan, is part of the heritage of General Motors. Built in 1896, it served as the headquarters of the Durant-Dort Carriage Company.

Although the company ceased making carriages in 1917, it transitioned into making automobiles and became the Dort Motor Car Company

This building was its headquarters until 1925. A historical marker notes that many decisions were made here that led to the forming of General Motors.

Nearby, is a statue of William “Billy” Durant and J. Dallas Dort, the founders of the carriage company known initially as the Flint Road Cart Company.

That company went out of the carriage business in 1917, but Durant and Dort went on into the business of making automobiles.

This statue of the two men stands next to the Flint River in the area where their manufacturing plants were located. Dort’s plaque had been removed at the time of my visit in October 2011.