Seeing Things, Saying Things

Musings About Writing, Photography and Teaching

Archive for the ‘cityscapes’ Category

Cleveland Skyline

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It is late on a Sunday afternoon in late September. A friend and I are visiting Wendy Park in downtown Cleveland, which runs along the west bank of the Cuyahoga River. It’s a great location from which to make a portrait of the skyline of Cleveland, or at least a portion of it.

Look carefully and you’ll see that the Huntington Bank building to the left of Key Tower appears to have two different shades. It is a produce of the sun hitting the angled building at different angles.

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Bridges of Cleveland

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The Flats area of Cleveland features several bridges over the Cuyahoga River.

Many carry or once carried railroad tracks that served industries in this traditional industrial district.

But many of the industries are gone, although not all of them, and some of the tracks are gone, too.

Shown are two angles of a drawbridge that once carried the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad over a branch of the river.

The rail line went to Whiskey Island but has since been abandoned.

So the bridge is frozen in the up position as a living monument of bygone era.

The building next to the bridge is Shooters restaurant and bar. The bust is of Leif Ericson, although I’m not sure what he had to do with Cleveland.

A City and its Lake

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Cleveland is one of a handful of large cities situated on one of the Great Lakes, in this case Lake Erie.

Although the city sometimes has acted as though the lake wasn’t there, particularly in downtown Cleveland,  it did establish a lakefront park just to the west of the central city area.

Edgewater Park is known for its beach, but at the western end of the park is a bluff overlooking the lake.

It also affords a sweeping view of the downtown city skyline and the lake.

The Edgewater Park beach can be seen to the right. With temperatures on this late September day soaring into the 90s, it was a popular place to be.

One Way to Move ’em

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We were taking a break during a visit to the Inner Harbor in Baltimore when I spotted this out of the ordinary means of propelling a stroller.

I suppose, though, that riding a unicycle will get parent and child there faster than walking and pushing.

Hey Indy!

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Many people hardly look out the window when they fly, but I make it a point to request a window seat and watch the landscape below as we cruise along.

I want to know where I am an I enjoy seeing places where I once lived and/or know.

I was en route from Cleveland to Phoenix aboard a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 when the captain said we were over Muncie, Indiana.

At the time, there was a cloud cover so I couldn’t see anything.  But I kept looking and soon the clouds parted and I was able to pick out Indianapolis, a city where I lived in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

That is the White River meandering just west of downtown.

Written by csanders429

June 9, 2017 at 3:31 pm

New York at Night

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I made my first and only visit to the observatory of the World Trade Center in early November 1981. I was visiting a friend who lived in the Big Apple although we had met back in Springfield, Illinois, when we both worked for the state.

We visited the WTC twice on the same day. The first visit occurred during daylight hours. I might have said something about what a nice view it would be at night.

Whatever the case, we returned that evening and I made this image. I don’t remember having a tripod. Perhaps we went back to Mark’s apartment to get one. I can’t imagine that I was traveling with a tripod.

This image was made on slide film and over the years it has badly faded. I scanned it anyway and through some Photoshop work was able to regain some of the image.

It would not only be the last time I visited the WTC it would also be the last time that I saw Mark. In fact, I can’t remember his last name or how to get in contact with him. Our last visit, though, was a memorable one.

Labor History Was Made Here

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Behind these locked gates once sat a massive General Motors complex where generations of Flint, Michigan, residents worked.

Known by many as “Chevy in the Hole,” the site is slowly being transformed into an urban park that will be known as Chevy Commons.

Work on the transformation began in March 2015 and is expected to cost nearly $2 million for its first phase.

Development of the Chevrolet Flint Manufacturing plant began in 1916 and at its peak the complex had 20 buildings of which eight were used for automotive assembly. Employment was 8,000 here and 89,000 in the Flint region.

Aside from building Chevrolet automobiles, the complex also produced engines, AC spark plugs and other automobile components.

GM began closing plants in Chevy in the Hole in 1984 and the last shift ended in 1992. Most of the buildings were demolished, the last of them being Plant 4 in 2004. The site became a vacant 13-acre brownfield.

The Chevy Commons park will be on the site where labor history was made with the start of the GM Sit-Down Strike that began in December 1936.

A marker along Chevrolet Boulevard tells the story of the strike and how it resulted in GM recognizing the United Auto Workers as the bargaining unit for GM workers in February 1937.

One surviving buildings has been donated to Kettering University, formerly the General Motors Institute while the other is still used as a GM tool and die shop.